• OK, that's not the most original title I should have thought of. But you must consider the fact I've just been through busy days typing lists, photocopying, buying pens, preparing lessons, covering notebooks... So, here we are. Whatever class you are in I hope you'll enjoy this new schoolyear.

    To start with something useful but also enjoyable, here's a link to one more BBC treasure :

    http://www.bbcactiveenglish.com/teen-english-zone_information.html

    This is a site especially designed for people who want to learn English, and there are pages actually aimed at teenagers. So, no excuse accepted, you've got to improve your English !

    You just have to click in the left-hand side column to see what English Language Learning activities that are available. Sometimes they're videos, other times they are PDF documents. Help yourself ! Enjoy yourself !

    And here is a cartoon to cheer up my Secondes who found so difficult to write their essays this afternoon :


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  • On one of my "looking-for-some-English-written-opinion-about-Reims" enterprise I found an article talking about our school ! It was written by one of the students who stayed with us last Spring. Read it ! It's fun.

    And I've realized that the main point of interest for American students in France is exactly the same as the one that kept our students alert when I took them to Scotland: FOOD!

    There are two details I'd like to point out. First I wonder whether the "chocolate panini" are actually our "pains au chocolat". Second I notice that the expression "YOLO" that I have recently learnt is used in the text. On the radio I've heard that even French young people use it in French. Do you use it?

    http://www.crossedsabres.org/student-life/2013/04/30/french-exchange-trip/#comment-10361

    This article was taken from http://www.crossedsabres.org/ the student-produced newspaper of the Washington-Lee High School community

    The two photos of Wahshington-Lee High School were taken from http://archinect.com/

     


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  • At Marc Chagall High School there is a place where you can work quietly, read magazines, newspapers, novels, comics, poetry..., borrow books, browse on the internet to find useful information. The list of what you can do there is definitely to long to be completed here. But if you need to ask any question address Violaine Azema or Alain Dulac, our two helpful librarians.

    A website has recently been created. It is welcoming, clear. It's easy to find whatever you're looking for. I've put a link in the right-hand-side column of this blog, but click HERE and you'll discover it too.

    Not only does Violaine keeps the site updated but she has also created a "prezumé" of Easy As Pie, and I can't resist the urge to publish it here. A little ad is not superfluous when it comes to improve one's English!


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  • Comics have a special place in French culture, even though they have to face Japanese competition with Mangas. But it is undeniable that French people read comics from childhood to old age. Wasn't Tintin Magazine's slogan "for young people from 7 to 77 years old" ? Yes, many comics come from Belgium,

    but the French have created comics that can be humorous or serious.

    Some of them are just works of art. Meanwhile what comics are the British reading ? I have found blogs where you will have an answer :

    http://newbritishcomics.blogspot.fr/

    http://www.geekchocolate.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=39&Itemid=61

     

      

      

    Let's hope it'll give you some ideas to be busy during your summer holidays.

     


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  • The baccalaureat's written exams are over. Now you may be getting ready for your orals. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for my L students !

    Meanwhile, you can find the subjects and the corrections for free here:

    http://lewebpedagogique.com/bac/


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  •  

    Su Blackwell's book sculpture, The Extasie, 2006. You may see other works by this British artist there :

     http://www.sublackwell.co.uk/portfolio-book-cut-sculpture/

    Early this year, it was announced that English GPs were to prescribe self-help books which patients suffering from anxiety, panic attacks and depression could borrow from their local library. The idea is clearly to help the 6 million people in England suffering from depression, considering that as much as two third of those people are not treated. Used in Wales as a treatment against mild cases of depression since 2005, bibliotherapy does work, as a medical research pubished in the journal Plos One shows: patients who have been reading targeted books for over a year have seen their levels of depression decrease  significantly. A long-time believer in the healing power of books, philosopher Alain de Botton opened The School of Life in 2008. Located near King’s Cross in Central London,  the school is a cultural enterprise whose aim is to offer services concerned with how to live wisely and well. As such, it includes a bibliotherapy service to guide people into the fascinating but often complex world of literature. A specialist explores members’ personal relationship with books and comes up with a selection perfectly suited to them and their needs, helping them discovering new literary directions. In France however, bibliotherapy still remains largely unknown to most people. A few articles have been published in national newspapers and magazines but word isn’t spreading as fast as in other countries like Denmark or New Zealand. Let’s hope that this article will help giving bibliotherapy a good press!

     Violaine Azéma


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  • If you enjoy looking at contemporary art, there is an unprecedented opportunity to stroll across the gardens of the restaurant "Les Crayères". 22 artists' works are on display. You'll have access to the garden until June 30th. It's free and sounds really exciting. Don't miss this event !

    This exhibition is entitled  "Géométrie Variable" (for which I haven't found any accurate translation, sorry.)

    http://www.tourisme-champagne-ardenne.com/activites/fetes-et-manifestations/exposition-geometrie-variable-au-domaine-les-crayeres/reims/o_10890.aspx


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  • An article published last month contains many eulogistic remarks about Reims. If you sometimes regret not living in the south or in Paris  most people consider the places to be, well, read this post by Paul Wade and you'll find out why foreigners like our city. Unsurprisingly the photo shows some clichés about France : Wine and romance !

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/france/9141121/Reims-France-a-cultural-city-guide.html

    The restaurants and hotels recommended are not the cheapest. But attracting wealthy tourists can't be bad for the city's economy.


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  • There's always something happening in Chagall High School

    This poster was designed by: Solene Donato, 1 STD2A 

    Last Tuesday I took my 2°2 students to attend a festival that took place in our high school.  We had been invited, like the rest of the students and adults, by the 1ères TSTD2A. Here is what they wrote on Friday about this experience:

    The name of the festival was Zarzaland. There were short shows presented by Barthou elementary school pupils and  Chagall high school students together. The shows took place in Marc Chagall High School in different places: outside and in classrooms.  The design classrooms are larger than ours ! The kids and the teenagers had created and installed sets. We didn't all see the same thing. It was all about nature, environment and health. To present their shows they used shadows, lights, music, puppets and costumes.

    We saw the story of a drop of water called Perlette, told by puppets and some kids, a play about vegetables and flowers and a shadow thetre play about a thief who stole colours.

    All the shows were free ! The kids did a good job ! The stories were for kids, so the audience was a little too old, but we thought the scenograpy was clever. 

    And personally I felt impressed and quite moved by this collaboration between two generations and I'd like to say "thank you" to the teachers who have worked all year long to produce such a beautiful festival.

    A. Sirot


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  • ...whose notions of time are vaguer than yours. John B. Priestly

      

    Now that the sun has remembered it was summer soon, we start thinking about holidays.

    If you want to know more about school holidays in England and other English-speaking countries, here is a useful website: http://www.halftermdates.co.uk/

    You'll see that it is note less complicated than here to know when someone is not at school and that our holidays aren't that long.

    If you are a seconde student, enjoy your long summer holidays. They are likely the last ones you'll have ever ! After that you'll have to take exams in may and June, and later on, when you are university students, maybe you'll have summer jobs that will reduce your holiday time.

     

     

     

     


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